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    Instructor Notes:

    • For materials preparations, click again on Samples and select Getting Started 1.
    • Read Every Day Counts® Teacher's Guide, Kanter and Gillespie, Great Source, 2005 or 2012 edition, p. 24-27.

    Each Day of School attach one 3" colored paper square to the Counting Tape (adding machine tape from EDC Kit). In addition to counting the squares and reading the corresponding numerals, you may also want to use the opportunity to model how to write each day’s new numeral. By changing the color of the squares after the first group of ten, children can see that we write eleven as one group of ten and one more, and twelve as one group of ten and two more, and so on. The Ten Grids provide another way to group and count the day's number and to introduce place value.


    Instructor Notes:

    • For materials preparations, click again on Samples and select Getting Started 1.
    • Read Every Day Counts® Teacher's Guide, Kanter and Gillespie, Great Source, 2005 or 2012 edition, p. 28-30.

    To introduce the Clock you might ask children to first describe ways the classroom clock and the Every Day Counts Clock are alike, and later tell ways they are different. Ask the class to watch as you color in one minute for each day up to the current Day of School. Alternating the color every five minutes will help children group and count by fives and ones.

    Many teachers have the class first count the minutes by ones and then by fives, clapping on the last five to signal the shift to counting by ones.

    Instructor Notes:

    • For materials preparations, click again on Samples and select Getting Started 1.
    • Read Every Day Counts® Teacher's Guide, Kanter and Gillespie, Great Source, 2005 or 2012 edition, p. 7-10.

    If you are on a year-round schedule or begin school in August, you may want to use the August calendar pieces for your first month of school. Both the August and September pieces present an abb circle, square, square pattern.

    To introduce the calendar, help the class read the days of the week across the top. It might be fun to invite everyone to sing "Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday", repeating the sequence twice, using the tune from Oh My Darling Clementine or another "days of the week" song.

    Turn the calendar piece for the first day of the month face up and invite the class to help you say each date, as you turn each piece face up to the present date.

    Children with upcoming birthdays can count the days on the calendar up to their birthdays and place their package tags in the appropriate spaces. As each birthday arrives, the tag is returned to the month’s Birthday Package.

    Instructor Notes:

    • For materials preparations, click again on Samples and select Getting Started 1.
    • Read Every Day Counts® Teacher's Guide, Kanter and Gillespie, Great Source, 2005 or 2012 edition, p. 21-23.

    The focus of Number Builder in September is combinations for five and the process of addition and subtraction. On two to three days a week have a volunteer place five counters into the two clear pockets to show a combination for five. Invite the class to suggest addition, take away subtraction, or comparing stories to go with the day's combination. Record one of the stories with an accompanying number sentence. Use the Domino Halves (TR 5) to represent the combination of the day in another way.

    Some teachers like to use the Double Dominoes (TR6) to make permanent cards for reviewing the combinations for five throughout the year.